Waterfront 10K

Months ago, when the Ontario Masters Association announced that the Toronto 10K was going to be its 10K championship race, I knew that I wanted to do it.  Even if my recovery from Boston was slow, I knew that I could be ready to race a 10K more than 8 weeks later.  However, I waited too long to register; by the time I sat down to enter, the race had sold out – 10,000 runners were all set to go and I wasn’t one of them.   Never did I imagine that the race would sell out so quickly.  But I really wasn’t all that surprised; Lululemon had come on board to sponsor this Canadian Running Series (CRS) race and, when Lululemon is involved with any race, it sells out quickly.

I took this as a sign.  First, maybe I did need more rest (and as time progressed further into the spring, it was obvious that I did) and not getting into the race simply forced me to take more time.  Secondly, it gave me a chance to volunteer with my club, Toronto Olympic Club, which always sends marshals to the CRS events.

One of the lessons that I learned from my father was the importance of volunteerism.  As a teacher, I luckily see it at my school on a regular basis; teachers volunteer their time to coach clubs/teams outside of school hours; parents come into the school to help in the classroom, with lunches, fundraising….But I also see a huge lack of volunteers in other areas of my life and it is often the same people who give their time again and again and again. So when I have the time to give back, I like to do just that.

Honestly, though, I wasn’t exactly thrilled about waking up early on Saturday morning.  Since the race started at 7:30 a.m, I had to be out of the house by 5:45 at the latest.  After many days and late nights of testing kids, marking, and writing reports, waking up before 5:00 a.m. on a Saturday was the last thing that I wanted to do.   But I had committed to helping so I set three alarms before falling asleep.  At 5:30, I was out the door and on my way to meet Monica, who was one of the lucky ones, and her boyfriend so that we could head into Toronto together.

One table of water cups ready to go!

After dropping me off, I walked to my post – about 3.5K into the race and just past the first water station.  On the way there, I realized that my bag of cowbells and noise makers was still at home, sitting by the door so I wouldn’t forget them.  Hmmmm….. Fortunately, I did have my teacher voice with me and was all set to put it to work on its own. By 7:00, the volunteers at the water station were almost finished the task of pre-filling hundreds of cups of water.  It was going to be a hot morning (it was already close to 23C) so the runners were going to need it.

I headed to the intersection where I was stationed with another TOC marshal, Chris.  He was organized enough to bring cowbells and, while I hesitated to borrow one, I found myself ringing a “Bell” bell within 15 minutes of the start of the race.

The Waterfront 10K had a variety of participants.   The wheelchair athletes started at 7:30 and they whizzed by on their machines.  They were followed by 6 waves, beginning with the elite athletes and ending with the walkers.  For Chris and me, there seemed to be a never-ending stream of runners.  We watched the tags on the bibs change from red to green to yellow and so on, each colour representing a different wave.  When we saw the first orange bibs come through, we knew that we were close to the end.

While marshalling, we noticed that all runners, no matter how fast or how slow, were giving their best.  We cheered the typical encouraging phrases such as good job, way to go, and you’ve got this.  But knowing that there were designated cheering sections after us, with groups like the Argos cheerleaders, a Jamaican band and a spin bike club, I decided to turn my cheering up a notch: “Good morning, runners!  Let’s wake up Toronto!” and “Let’s rock this town!”  We were simply the opening act for the entertainment to follow; we had to set the cheer standard.  Of course, our bells were ringing loudly and I was told later that they could be heard two blocks away; I’m surprised that I didn’t go home with a blister on my finger.  Every now and then, someone smiled back at us and we knew that our cheering, while a bit crazy, was appreciated.

When we were done our shift, I walked to the finish line at Ontario Place and was able to catch the spin bikes as they were wrapping up.  Ontario Place was busy – after all, thousands of runners and families were going through there – so we left as soon as I found Monica and Stefan.  She ran a speedy 40ish minutes, making her one of the top finishers in a huge race.

While the early start was a bit of a pain, I loved that we were back on the road by 9:30 and heading home.  Looking towards next year, I’m not sure if I do want to race this event.  There was a lot of positive feedback from those who did, but I think the flat course in downtown Toronto may not be what I want in a 10K.  Maybe I’ll return to volunteer again instead.  I have loads of time to decide – well, at least until they open registration for next year’s event.

 

 

 

 

Author: Cynsspace

I am a 50+ mother of two boys, a wife, a dog owner, and teacher. Mixed in between, I train to stay competitive as a Masters Runner in the Canadian racing scene. This is my story “Cyn’s Space” – the good, the bad and anything else that comes to mind.

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