Race Report: Boxing Day Ten Miler

Last Monday, Dave and I went to Hamilton so that I could race the Boxing Day Ten Miler.  While time and place are important to me, I was using the race mostly to see where I am at in terms of my own fitness.  Since the beginning of December, my running has consisted of, well, just running.  There has been no speed work, no tempos, and no hill practices.  My busy month of work and family activities and the icy streets have resulted in a slight drop in my weekly mileage so I had just one goal: to run as fast as I can and feel good.  I was really hoping that I could race in under 75 minutes.

Based on how my running had been going this fall, I felt that I could run that.  I was up for the challenge of racing the day after Christmas, on a course with gentle rolling hills and a noon start.  “If nothing else,” I told myself, “I’ll get in a good run and spend some time with Monica.”

Monica is one of my training partners.  We run together when we can, which usually only means once a week.  If I’m lucky, it ends up on a day when I am running long; when I am unlucky, it’s a day when she is doing intervals.  Monica was also going into the Ten Miler with a “casual” attitude; it was just a post-Christmas tempo run.  Unlike me, though, Monica has been doing all of the right things in her training and she was bound to have a strong race.

On the drive out to Hamilton, it poured.  Over Christmas weekend, temperatures rose to slightly above zero, so the precipitation was rain – heavy rain.  Most of it had passed by the time the race started but we still had some drizzle and a cold rain that leaves a chilled to the bone feeling. I actually didn’t mind it because the rain kept the temperatures a little more comfortable for racing.

There were, however, a few things that I didn’t like about the race.   There were several problems with the start, for example, as most of us had no idea of the direction we were to start in;  that’s an important detail in any race.  Secondly, all runners in the 4 mile run and 10 miler began at the same time, which is so unusual in today’s road racing scene.  I know that I am not alone in wishing that there were two starts, one for each group; even a 5 minute delay would have helped alleviate some of the congestion.   There was also a bit of chaos in how the actual start was managed.  The race director announced “Two Minutes!” Runners put on their race faces, and the race director said, “Go!”  without any extra warning, no horn, nothing – just “Go.”  People scrambled forward, surprised by the casual approach.

Finisher’s Medal with 95th year (should be 96th)

Hamilton is nicknamed “Steeltown” after the steel-making industry and, on Monday, the skies were as grey as its name.  We can’t control the weather but the course would have been a lot nicer on a sunny day.  Even when we ran along Bayfront, which is normally a scenic area, we had nothing but concrete, barren trees, grey water and grey skies.  The first 5K were downhill or flat.  I went out too fast for the first two kilometres, which is easy to do on a downhill start, and spent the next three dialing my pace back under control.  By the time I hit the 8K mark (around 36:50), I felt that I had my pace exactly where I wanted it to be.  Of course, every downhill is followed by a climb and we had a long one between 8K and 9/10K (it’s a bit of a blur right now).   Then we ran up and down the hilly roads/paths until we had a last gradual (and long) climb to the finish.  I ran 1:14:20 – mission accomplished.  We headed inside, changed into warm clothes and had some hot tomato soup.   Yum!

And I felt great.  Monica ran a speedy 64 minutes and complained about being sore the next day.  Not me!  My legs felt fresh and ready to go.  Obviously, I could have pushed myself more.

Second Place Age Group Award: Belt Buckles!

Both of us finished second in our age groups and that leaves me with my final criticism of the race: the awards.  First, the finisher’s medal had a “95th year” ribbon on it, but this was the 96th year.  I, as did several other runners, felt that we were given leftovers from 2015.  Similarly, we were given a bronze coloured buckle for our second place finish.  I questioned it – twice because it seemed so odd that ours was bronze but the 3rd place was more silver – but they insisted that we had the correct awards.  I still feel like there was an error, or we were given leftovers from previous races when runners did earn belt buckles for running within a certain time.  It’s not a big deal, but it irks my sometimes-ocd personality.

I know exactly where I lost to the first place winner, who finished less than a minute ahead of me.  At the second last aid station, I stopped to make sure that I was getting Gatorade into me as I felt my sugar levels were dropping a bit; that’s where she passed me there.  But rather than push myself to chase her, I simply started running again.  Had I known that she was in my age group, I definitely would have given myself a good kick in the butt.  Just before we climbed the last hill, I saw that the gap between us had narrowed, but I still didn’t feel the need to chase her down.  After the awards, I wish that I had.  Next time.

After the Boxing Day Ten Miler. And it stopped raining!

I got what I wanted out of the Boxing Day Ten Miler: a decent race, a baseline to build on in 2017, time with a friend.  What I didn’t quite expect, though, was a boost in my confidence again – the realization that I am stronger than I think.  Bring on 2017!

 

 

Welcome 2017

I’m not usually one for setting resolutions when the year changes, but I do set goals.  Then I revisit them, revise them, and chase new dreams.  In 2016, my goal was to become physically stronger as a runner.  While my race times weren’t stellar, they were good enough to earn age group awards and earn a spot to compete in the Canadian 5K Championship race.   It was a year of running based on raw talent – running without tempos, speedwork, or hill training.

Road2Hope Half Marathon, Hamilton
After the Boxing Day Ten Miler

In the past few weeks, while laying out my training plan for Boston, I’ve realized two things.  First, I am a fairly decent runner, but I’m nearing the end of my age group (50-54) so I have to do something different if I want to stay competitive.   Secondly, I am stronger than I think.  In my past two races, I really just wanted to see how I would run, hoping to finish the Road2Hope Half-Marathon (November) in under 1:40 and the Boxing Day Ten Miler (December) in less than 75 minutes.  I ran 1:37 and 74 minutes, respectively, and I felt good.  Obviously, my base is solid; it is time to change my training.

So my 2017 goal is to bump up my training and cross-training in terms of distance, intensity and frequency.  This month, my plan is to add speedwork and/hills into my running but I am absolutely terrified of doing either in the dark, especially when it’s icy.  And let’s be frank; I don’t like either of them anyway.  I’d rather just run.  But like so many other things that are good for me, speedwork and hills must be run if I am going to be in shape for Boston.  By running right after work, on the streets that surround my school, I should be able to get in a decent workout before daylight is lost.

Just hanging out at Climbers Rock.

During my marathon prep, I am also going to increase my cycling (windtrainer miles) so that I can strengthen my quads and be ready for the Boston hills.  My core is another area for me to focus on, which can easily be strengthened with consistency at the yoga studio and indoor climbing gym.

These goals are not part of a new year; they simply coincide with it as part of my plan for Boston.   They are in place to help me become better than I am and the runner that I aspire to be.

Chasing my dreams….

 

 

 

 

My Profile

I am a 50+ mother of two boys, a wife, a dog owner, and teacher.  In between my family and occupational roles, I train  competitively as a Masters Distance Runner in the Ontario racing scene.  Cyn’s Space is my story – the good, the bad and anything else that comes to mind.

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Game Time

“Sometimes courage is the little voice at the end of the day that says, I’ll try again tomorrow.”  Dennis Edney 

Picking my fall races is a challenge.   It’s cross-country season, there are lots of different distances for road racing and, of course, there are a lot of marathons.  There are so many great events to pick that I could race every weekend if I wanted.  I sat down at the computer a few weeks ago to try to decide on which races to run.  Resigned that I was not going to marathon this fall, I looked primarily at half-marathons and cross-country, but every single marathon listed seemed to jump from the screen.  “Pick me!  Pick me!”  I caved.

I love everything about training for the marathon distance.   Watching weekly mileage climb has a powerful feeling; every long run finished leaves me feeling satisfied; fulfilling the commitment to train, which means planning to eat, drink, and sleep around running builds mental strength.  Most of all, I love the sense of commitment that marathoners show and the confidence that they gain in training and elation of crossing the finish line.

When I made the decision to not run the Victoria Marathon, I was genuinely upset about it, but it was the right decision to make.  However, for weeks following, I was being tormented by the October line-up of marathons:  Prince Edward County, Scotiabank, Prince Edward Island, Hamilton.  All of them were doable, but how doable?  How much fitness did I lose?

After 2 rest weeks of lower mileage (40-45k) and no long runs, I had to test myself.  F

New Balance Shoes
Boldly making the switch to New Balance 1080’s

our Monday mornings ago, I woke up before dawn and finished 19K – and I felt good!  That weekend, I ran 21K, met my friend, Monica, part way through and felt not so good.  That same week,  I made a few minor changes to my running lifestyle, which included new shoes and pampering my feet a bit more, and my third long run (another 21K) felt great.   I looked at the fall racing calendar, my family calendar and my work schedule and I started to plan.  “I can make this work” I thought.  “I can be ready for Hamilton.”

 

post long-run
Post Long Run

And now it’s game time.  Yesterday, I upped my game and threw a 10K tempo into my long run (giving me a total of 25K) and ran a 12K trail recovery this morning.  In the past month, I have watched my weekly mileage climb from 40K to 66K, and I feel great about it.  This week, I get a little more serious as I add more yoga and 2 cycling workouts to my week so that I have a stronger core and quads so that I am ready for ‘net downhill’.

 

I know the next few weeks are going to be a bit crazy.  The boys are back in school, I have a new teaching assignment, and coaching soccer starts soon.  But, for whatever reason, running a fall marathon is in me and, like I tell the kids at school, “When you want something badly enough, you can make it happen.”  run over obstacles

Race Report: Mercedes Benz Summer 5K

MB afterThis has been another summer when I haven’t planned a lot of racing as I had been training for the Victoria Marathon.  After making the decision to not marathon on the other side of the country, I started planning a race schedule with events closer to home.  The Summer 5K was at the top of my list; it was a new running event, and it was close to home.  Knowing that it was sponsored by Mercedes Benz and organized by vrPro, it was bound to be a good event.

On Sunday morning, my teen son who has been playing around with photography for the past few weeks, offered to come with me.  “I’m leaving early,” I warned him.  But the idea of practising action shots was calling him.  Just before 8:00, we pulled into the Mercedes Benz parking lot and, while I went to pick up my race kit, he caught a few more z’s.  The start was at 10:00 and it was already hot and sunny.

The volunteers from Mercedes Benz and Kelly Arnott of vrPRO were busy getting set up.  Registration was open, men were setting up the barbecue for the after-race, the Pearl Izumi van with its tent had just pulled in…and the bathrooms were ready – inside the building!  In fact, the bathroom facilities were one of the most exciting parts of the race: private stalls with doors with locks that actually worked, sinks with running water, paper towels, and mirrors.  It was the first time that I have had access to such a luxurious bathroom at a race.

Feeling anxious, I headed out about 15 minutes earlier than planned to warm up and was I ever glad I did!  When I registered for the race, I thought “Burlington – flat.  This should be a nice, easy course.”  The terrain seemed flat on the course video too.  But when I started to warm up, I realized how wrong I was.  As soon as I turned out of the parking lot, I faced a very slight incline, which became a bit steeper as I approached the 1K mark.  As I continued to run, I saw the course plateau a bit and breathed a sigh of relief, only to get to the top and – you guessed it – saw the road climb again.  I turned around to head back to the start to warm up and get my head into the game, realizing that I would have to carefully pace the first half of the race so that my legs wouldn’t fry at the end.

And that’s exactly what I did.  MB 1k check I checked my watch at 1K and my timing was exactly where I wanted it to be: 4:20.  The next 1500 metres were basically uphill and I knew there were a lot of women ahead of me.  “Keep it like this,” I told myself.  “You have 4 kilometres left to catch them in.”  It took 5 minutes to run the next kilometre (uphill), during which I picked my targets to pass, one by one.  Each time, I listened for their breathing to figure out how much space was behind me and how much more of a gap I needed to open.  There was one more in sight and she would not let me pass her.  When I moved right, she moved right; if I ran left, she ran left.  So much for a friendly local race.  I threw in a surge and fought to work my way around her and had the upper hand (or foot) at the halfway point.  Now, there were no women in sight – but I knew there were still 6 or 7 ahead, judging by a volunteer’s counting – and I faced the part of the course I had been dreading more: the downhill.

I hate running downhill.  In a race situation, it ends up being a real quad-buster for me, and I have avoided races like the Sporting Life 10K just because of the fast decline.  Here, all I needed to do was (1) keep my pace and (2) stay ahead of the women behind me.  It wasn’t long before I realized that keeping my pace was not enough as I could hear panting behind me; I was certain that it was the lady who kept cutting me off.

Final K
Approaching 4K.

Sure enough, it was and it wasn’t long before we were running neck and neck, each of us trying to pull ahead of the other.  Holding my pace was not going to happen; I had to pick it up. “Stay with her, Cynthia.  Fight it.”  We turned and the finish line was in sight.  Now we were on a relatively flatter surface but into the highway wind and with about 700 metres to go, I pulled ahead.  Silence.  I felt the awkward stillness of her feet stopping behind.  “Keep pushing.  You can’t be sure that was her.”  I stretched out my legs a little bit more, ensuring that I opened the gap a little more and hoped to catch two more gals who suddenly came into sight.  Both were slowly down and if there were a little more real estate, I probably could have caught them, but I ended up finishing seconds behind.

 

MB shoes
Samples of the Pearl Izumi shoes to take for a test run.

Was I happy with my time?  Not at all.  I finished in 22:39, which is slow for me.  However, the conditions were similar to the Beamsville Bench 5K that I raced last year and times were comparable.  I also finished in the top 10 (whoever was counting missed a few) and first in my age group, which earned me a pair of Pearl Izumi shoes.  Hooray for new shoes!

 

The reality, though, is I wasn’t training for this race.  It was a C-race; I just threw myself into it to see what I could do: race with my head, pick up the pace when I needed to, run tough.  My time wasn’t stellar but I can live with it, and it has given me some time goals to focus on while I keep chasing my dreams.

What Were They Thinking?

gisele
Supermodel Gisele Bundchen, on her final walk.

After 3 days of success stories, tears and losses, the one image that I still can not get out of my mind – the one that stands out the most – is from the opening ceremonies.  Three days later, and I am still shocked that Gisele Bundchen was a part of the opening to Rio 2016.

The Olympic Opening ceremonies should do two things: promote international sport and the culture of the hosting country.  The first was easily done.  All athletes were invited to participate, but some chose not so that they didn’t have to spend so much time on their feet, tiring themselves out and hindering their chances on their day of competition.  No matter where you live, watching your national athletes walk into the stadium fills your heart with pride.  And if you didn’t see your favorite athlete, your hero, you immediately felt a sense of disappointment.   Secondly, even under the tight budget when compared to recent Olympics, Brazilian culture was well represented under Fernando Mereilles’ direction in which he creatively captured Brazilian history, science and entertainment while emphasizing the international importance of the rain forest.   But a supermodel?  Where exactly does she fit in?

Gisele is Brazilian.  That’s it.  The Brazilian athletes weren’t singled out so why was she?  She is fit and she is married to football player Tom Brady, but neither is a part of Olympic sport.  In my eyes, Gisele was there because sex sells.

Is it the low budget that compelled Mereilles to bring her into the opening ceremonies?  Was a significant donation made to the event if Gisele strutted her final walk across the stage?  The question I keep asking myself, though, is “Aren’t we past the point of using beauty and sex to promote?”  Clearly, we are not.

Gisele’s strut screamed, “Look at me.  I’m fabulous.”  It had nothing to do with sports and it did not represent Brazilian culture.  It had no place in an international sporting event.

 

 

 

 

Running With the Girls

And by girls, I don’t mean daughters, friends or other women who run.  I am referring to the “girls”,  breasts, bosoms, or whatever anatomically correct or affectionate nickname you want to give them.

A few weeks ago, I was doing the “mom” thing: hanging out at the park with my friend, Susan, watching our boys run around with soccer balls.  For some reason, and I can’t ever imagine why (heehee),  our conversation turned to running.

“I wish I could run.  You’re so lucky,” she commented.  “It must be so nice to feel that freedom.”

Admittedly, I was surprised. Susan is a single mom of two boys who are involved with hockey, soccer and swimming.  When she is not working, she is often chauffeuring them from one activity to another and, when she isn’t, you can be sure that it is because she is cooking, cleaning, and looking after them at home.  I honestly didn’t think that she wasn’t interested in running or participating in other types of fitness for herself.  Until now, the subject never really came up.

“You can run,” I said.  “You just need to start slowly.  I can help you get started.”

“I can’t.  I need to find a bra that fits first.   It’s too painful to run.”

duct tape
Mangled, ripped and stained – and no supportive fabric.

Susan continued to describe one of her bras that she duct-taped together.  “Both sides were duct taped so the underwire would poke me.  Then the underwire started coming through the bottom.”  The struggle was real.

 

DSC_0388
Running Skirts Strappy Top

Fortunately, finding a sports bra is something I have never had to worry about.   I always wear Running Skirts strappy bra, which is comfortable, supportive and cute but, for my Double K friend, that just wouldn’t do.  I started to picture previous covers of magazines with running success stories, photos of larger women who have lost inches and dropped sizes after they started to run.   What did they wear?   I have read about some ladies who double-barrel to give them the support that they need.  We talked about designing a bra for her and finding a seamstress to make it.  I was determined to find a solution.  Someone must have an idea of what works.  That’s when I turned to social media.

 

One of the groups I reached out to was Another Mother Runner on Facebook.  I explained the problem my well-endowed friend was facing, and asked if they could reach out to their community.  After a few days, I had dozens of responses and it became clear that Susan was not alone.   Not only did we have a list of sports bras to select from, we had online sites  (Break out Bras, Her Room, Bare Necessities) with great customer service that Susan could turn to for more advice.

Today, Susan headed to the Inside Story , known for its amazing customer service, for a fitting and decide on a purchase.  She has narrowed it down to….

Freya freya bra

Panachepanache

Enellenell

 

 

As bad luck would have it, the store doesn’t carry any sports bra that fits – period.  The sales associate is going to do her best to find something that works.  We are also looking at shopping online, a little easier but still a very frustrating process.  The Juno bra by Moving Comfort, for example, was highly recommended for big-bosomed ladies, but we can’t find her size.   Hopefully, we’ll find something that does the trick and keeps the girls under wraps before the end of the summer and Susan can “feel the freedom” that she is wanting so desperately.

 

 

 

 

Following the Stars

Over the weekend, several messages about a weekend run were flying between a friend and me and, then, they stopped.  Silence.  Our run didn’t happen.  And a few hours after that run that should have happened, I got another message: “Body still isn’t working and kids are being disasters….Maybe it was just not meant to be this morning.”  To that, I replied, “Yup, sometimes you just have to wait for the stars to line up.”

That’s the message that I have had to tell myself for the past week.  This summer, I have been building mileage towards a fall marathon.  My initial goal to run Quebec City fell apart because of my son’s soccer schedule so I quickly planned other options.  I really wanted to marathon in Victoria, B.C. for several reasons.   I use to live in Vancouver, and I have been itching to go back.  The timing worked because it was over Thanksgiving Weekend so I would have an extra travel day.   Finally, one of my training partners, Kelly-Lynne, is aiming to run the half in Victoria.  All signs were pointing to the west coast.

Then, last week happened.  I had been waiting for a few weeks to hear back from my employer about whether I could take an extra day, and I needed to confirmation before the end of the month so that I could book my flight.  Well, I am still waiting and the seat sale is over.  Secondly, while my two boys really want to take an early school break, my husband isn’t thrilled about making a long distance trip (3400 kilometres, or 2200 miles) for just a few days.  Lastly, my feet are starting to hurt.  For the past few long runs (22+ kilometres), I have been getting achy feet.  Like most runners, this always happens to me during marathon training, but this time the pain is different; it’s sharper, and it lasts a lot longer.  It’s the kind of pain that makes me think that I am setting myself up for injury, and I don’t want that to happen – especially if I do decide to run Boston in the spring.   And, I certainly do not want to make the long and expensive trip to run in Victoria if I am not feeling 100 percent.

All summer, my training has been going well; it has been great.  My mileage has increased the way I wanted it to, and I’m feeling power in my legs that I haven’t had in a while.  But the stars weren’t in line for my flying to Victoria in October, and I need to follow the stars.

Did this upset me?  Yes, of course.  But there is always another marathon.  Whatever the reason, this one was just not meant to be.  noneedtospeed Meanwhile,  I’ve slowed down a little and had an easy 10 days of training to rest and think about some different goals for the fall – maybe a little track, a bit of trail racing, cross-country, some road racing, or some pot-pourri of all. And who knows?  Maybe the stars will realign themselves and I will find that other marathon.

“This is Not a Race” Report: Run for the Toad Training Run

My husband, Dave,  has volunteered with the Run for the Toad 25k/50K trail race for a few years.  It’s one of the biggest trail races in Ontario, and several runners from other parts of Canada and the USA fly in to participate.  Dave has been wanting me to run it but the race always seems to conflict with my other running goals.

A few weeks ago, Dave asked me to participate in the training run weekend.  Basically, the event organizers organize a day of running on the trail loop (12.5K) so that their volunteers can practise for race day in October.  I ran the training event two years ago so running it again to measure where I am in my training made good sense.  But this time, I decided that I wanted to cover 25K and use it as part of my marathon training.

“Are you crazy?” Dave asked.  “It’s a tough course.  It’s like running 30K on the roads.”
“I’ll be fine,” I told him. “I ran 22K last week and the week before.  I have water stations and company to run with here.  I’ll be okay.”

Toad - KellyLynne and meOne of my training partners, Kelly-Lynne who eats trails for breakfast, decided to join me.  She knows the course well as her cross-country team trained on it when she was at Western University.  Her plan was to run 12.5K and, if she felt good, she would run more.

The run started at 9:00 and temperatures were going to climb to the mid-30’s.  I am fine running in heat but not when the sun is high.  We knew that we needed to slow the pace down, to run something comfortably so that we would finish and feel good.  My marathon pace is around 5 minutes/kilometre we thought 5:00 to 5:30 on this course was reasonable.  Like any other trail, though, you can’t really pace yourself other than by the “what feels right” pace.  So that ended up being the plan: run, talk, run and have some fun.

The hills: they were the challenge.  Within the first 3 kilometres, I told Kelly-Lynne that I didn’t remember the course being as hilly the last time that I ran it.  Ture to the nature of hills, though,  every hill that went up also went down.  Some of them seemed to climb forever and others seemed to go up at a 90 degree angle (especially Skeleton Hill, towards the end, which was  a complete calf-buster).  But the hills were doable as they were hiding under a canopy of trees.

For me, the toughest part of the course was dealing with the sun.  I was able to deal with the heat but when we came from out of the trails into the open, under the hot sun with no cloud coverage, I started to feel nauseous.  As soon as we got back into the shade, though, the sickness went away.

Toad - done!
Done!

Kelly-Lynne ended up running the entire 25K with me.  We realized at the end how well we actually covered the course as our second loop was only 3 minutes slower than our first – not bad with the change in temperature.  Also, quite a few runners around us dropped out during the second lap.  I think that running an easier pace played a big factor in our finishing, and the smart pacing was confirmed when, in the last kilometre, we passed a few runners who were way ahead of us earlier in the run.

 

Even though it wasn’t a race, I often had to remind myself of that.  I often wanted to pick up the pace but I kept turning the dial the other way, making sure that I slowed down and respected the heat.  It worked.

And now I have one more thing to consider as part of my fall racing.  After the weekend, I realize that I really do want to race this course one day.  Which year?  Only time will tell.