It Takes a Village To Raise a Marathoner: Part 1

There have been several key players – runners and non-runners – behind me during my training cycle but it has been my family (Dave, The Oldest Dude and The Littlest Dude) who have been behind me every step of the way.  Recently, they have been beside me too.

I didn’t truly recognize the support that the boys were giving me until the past week.  Since it was the last week of summer vacation, or the week before school starts, I had been at school every day to get my classroom ready.  As bad timing had it, my husband decided to go away for a few days to Northern Ontario.  While I admittedly enjoyed being able to hog the bed and sleep diagonally each night, I was a little stressed about having the boys on my own while getting things set up for school.   The combination of busy days, a working teen, a heat alert, an absent husband and the beginning of the last build-up towards the Chicago Marathon were bound to end in disaster.

Each night, I was able to run as planned.   The oldest dude planned for a night at home on Tuesday so that I could get to a workout with my club.  On Wednesday, The Littlest Dude rode his bike with me when I ran.  Thursday was a write-off, but I simply bumped that run to Friday.  I went out on my own early on Saturday morning and ran a disappointing 16K; the heat got to me…again.   That afternoon, with all three boys in the house, it was time for the “talk.”

16 mile fence
What a poser! Taking a break from another hot weather (37C) run.

“Look,” I said, “I have 5 more weeks.  School starts next week.  I’m already tired.  I need help around the house and I need a bit of support with my running.  It’s hot – too hot.  Some days, I need one of you to ride with me.”

They understood and it immediately showed.  The next day, I headed out into the trails for a late afternoon run, with the humidex hovering around 37C.  The oldest dude met me half-way with water and Gatorade, and he managed to take some pictures of me running.

labour day
Two hot runs with a yoga class in the middle.

Yesterday, I had two shorter runs planned with a yoga class in the middle.  When I was about to head out the door for my second run of the day, The Littlest Dude called out, “Wait!  How far are you going?  Can I come with you?”   He strapped on his helmet and stuffed my phone in his pocket.  Half way through, we stopped so he could take pictures; using my phone has become a real treat for him.

It was my husband’s turn to shine today.   I got home from school and discovered that he had done some dusting – the first of the three jobs he has for the week.  After I have been doing all of the cleaning for the past two months, it was a relief to have someone else take over part of it.

From the beginning of my training for Chicago, I knew that the start of the school year while finishing my marathon build-up was going to be a challenge.   Today, I have finished Week 1 of the three most difficult weeks.  Everyone at home is doing what they can to take away some of the day to day tasks and keep me running.  All I need to do it keep chasing my dreams.

 

 

 

 

Supporting Our Athletes on Home Soil

The boys and I have been pretty excited about the PanAm Games being in Toronto.  Now, for those of you who aren’t in Toronto, the Games are really being held in Toronto, Milton, Mississauga, St. Catherine’s, Hamilton and a few more suburbs on the other side of Toronto.  So, really, they aren’t just being held in Toronto and this makes getting to them a logistical nightmare; from where we are, getting to any of the venues takes some effort.

But so does raising a child.  How could I not give my boys the opportunity to see some of our national athletes compete on home soil?   Tickets are reasonably priced and they include the cost of public transit.  Soccer was the obvious choice as games are at the Tim Horton Stadium in Hamilton, which is close to home, one son plays soccer and the other referees the game.   For me, it is important that my guys see Canada play.

boys at soccerYesterday, the three of us dressed in Canada’s colours and headed to the GO station to watch Brazil play Peru and, then, Canada face Panama.  We got to the stadium in time to watch Brazil, Peru and their referees warm up.   Son #1 had his eyes on the refs and was obviously taking mental notes on what he could be doing  before he takes charge of the field.  I pointed out to both boys that a lot of the drills are the same as the ones that we use when running and reminded them that a lot of world-class runners use to be soccer players.  When I heard, “Look, he’s doing some accelerations!”  I knew that running terminology was becoming more and more natural to the littlest dude.  What I also liked was seeing a different drill – a combination of A’s and side-stepping – that I will use with the kids when I start coaching cross-country again.

Oddly enough, the first game between Brazil and Peru seemed to take forever.  I had one restless child who was losing interest quickly.   We broke the monotony of sitting by going for walks, getting a drink, and exploring the stadium.  Half-way through the second half, he wanted to go home.  I waited for the ultimate meltdown to occur.  “Relax,” I told him.  “When Canada gets on the field, the game will be so much better.  You’ll see.”

And it was.  Even though it was an 8:30 start and only about 40% of the stadium was filled (a lot of people left after the first game), it was the place to be.  We cheered, we did the wave (many times), we watched a beach ball being bumped around from section to section until a volunteer took it away, and we cheered some more.  The littlest dude asked for his ipod, which we brought for the train ride home, so that he could take some pictures.  There were no requests to go for a walk; there wasn’t any whining about being tired of sitting.  Without a doubt, he was happy.   And my teen?  He was thrilled that he was able to watch, not one, but two games with national level athletes.

Both boys loved the chance to see our athletes play so close to home.  We talked about how sad it was to see the stands so “grey” during the second game.  “Yeah, Canadians need to watch our own team play, not just leave,” commented the littlest dude. mom and drew And he is right.  Seeing Brazil play Peru was great, but supporting Canada is really what it is all about.  We did – and we’re going back for more.  Go Canada!

 

The Challenge of Change

Like most kids, my 9 year old is often keen to try something new.  But he also loses interest very quickly.   If I am lucky enough that he does stay interested, it is usually due to sameness of the activity – whether it be the structure of the same day and time, the routines surrounding it, or the “no surprise” approach.

Last week, after we started riding our bikes in the mornings, I completely expected him to be bored within days.  He isn’t.  Without even thinking about it, I have managed build consistency around our cycling and that has kept him motivated.   We ride in the morning; he picks the route; we always plan to add a bit more distance each time.  Consistency.

This week, I have been trying desperately to get him to do something different.  “Let’s ride north this time,” I suggested.  “Nope, I’m good,” he replied. “I’ve got a route planned.”  And he did – the same route as the one before but a little bit longer.  Last night, I almost tasted a mommy victory when I got him to ride with me while I headed out with my running club, somewhere different and farther.  At first, everything seemed fine but, once he realized it wasn’t just me he’d be riding with, he walked away.

Tonight, I changed my approach.  I gave him incentive.  “I’m going for a run into the trails and I need you to come with me.  I want to take some pictures in Sixteen Mile Creek so I need you to carry my phone.  That’s right.  I told my kid that he could carry my phone around with him – on his bike.  The coolness factor overpowered him.  “Wait, can I watch the end of this show?  It’s only 13 more minutes.”  Sold!  I had a cycling photographer.

Sixteen Mile Creek - bottom hillKnowing that he prefers trails to roads, we started on a gravel path for the first 2K.  Sure enough, within those first 2K, he was bored.  But as soon as we got into the trail system, the adventure began.  We had the challenge of hills, the beauty of green space, and the excitement of being alone to pull us deeper and deeper into the system.   When one hill became too difficult to ride, I walked up his bike while he found places to climb and take pictures, pictures that I didn’t really need other than to make his presence feel valued.  Four kilometres into the our ride/run, we decided to take a slightly longer route as it would be less hilly and an easier ride home.

It wasn’t long before we realized we were lost, and another adventure began.   We worked our way out of the trail system and navigated back to familiar streets.  Again, he pulled out my phone to take pictures.  This time, he tried his hand at action shots.

Postmaster RunWhen we got home, he asked if he could ride with me again.  He has goals: to ride downhill, to ride part of the way up the big hill, and to learn to take some cool pictures.  To me, that sounds like time well spent together.